Szerep Portál

Minden, ami kultúra

12 notes

vintageanchor:

The first new installment in the Professor Dr von Igelfeld series since 2004 was just released in the U.S…  UNUSUAL USES FOR OLIVE OIL by Alexander McCall Smith. Professor Doctor Doctor Moritz-Maria von Igelfeld, author of the highly regarded Portuguese Irregular Verbs (200 copies sold) and a pillar of the Institute of Romance Philology in the proud Bavarian city of Regensburg, finds that life is very difficult these days. His academic rival (and owner of a one-legged dachsund) Detlev-Amadeus Unterholzer has been winning undeserved recognition. With help from the matchmaking Ophelia Prinzel, he stumbles toward a romance with Frau Benz, a charming widow who owns her very own Schloss and a fleet of handsome cars. While on the annual student study retreat in the Alps, von Igelfeld fearlessly plunges 3000 feet into mountaineering history, only to suffer the ignominy of giving inspirational lectures about the experience. And at a dinner party, he is the only kind soul who can aid the aforementioned unfortunate dachshund, whose sticky wheels are in need of lubrication.

vintageanchor:

The first new installment in the Professor Dr von Igelfeld series since 2004 was just released in the U.S…

UNUSUAL USES FOR OLIVE OIL by Alexander McCall Smith. Professor Doctor Doctor Moritz-Maria von Igelfeld, author of the highly regarded Portuguese Irregular Verbs (200 copies sold) and a pillar of the Institute of Romance Philology in the proud Bavarian city of Regensburg, finds that life is very difficult these days. His academic rival (and owner of a one-legged dachsund) Detlev-Amadeus Unterholzer has been winning undeserved recognition. With help from the matchmaking Ophelia Prinzel, he stumbles toward a romance with Frau Benz, a charming widow who owns her very own Schloss and a fleet of handsome cars. While on the annual student study retreat in the Alps, von Igelfeld fearlessly plunges 3000 feet into mountaineering history, only to suffer the ignominy of giving inspirational lectures about the experience. And at a dinner party, he is the only kind soul who can aid the aforementioned unfortunate dachshund, whose sticky wheels are in need of lubrication.

(Source: vintageanchorbooks)

136 notes

ransomcenter:

Read the accompanying article, “Sangorski & Sutcliffe: The Rolls Royce of Bookbinding” on the Ransom Center’s blog, Cultural Compass.

Front cover of Thomas Moore’s “Lalla Rookh” with a jeweled binding by Sangorski & Sutcliffe.

Back cover of Thomas Moore’s “Lalla Rookh” with a jeweled binding by Sangorski & Sutcliffe.

A Sangorski & Sutcliffe edition of Lewis Carroll’s “The Hunting of the Snark” is bound of Lewis Carroll’s The Hunting of the Snark is bound in leather with stingray onlay

“The Hunting of the Snark” has semiprecious stones inlaid inside the front cover.

“The Hunting of the Snark”  has semiprecious stones inlaid inside the back cover.

Title page of the illuminated manuscript of “Selected Poems of Edgar Allan Poe” bound by Sangorski & Sutcliff.

“Lenore,” an illuminated leave “Selected Poems of Edgar Allan Poe” bound by Sangorski & Sutcliffe.

The cover of James Russell Lowell’s “The Vision of Sir Launfal” is handwritten in calligraphy on parchment by Alberto Sangorski with decorative borders and illuminated miniatures.

Cover of Percy Shelley’s poem “The Sensitive Plant” bound by Sangorski & Sutcliffe. The text is handwritten on parchment by Alberto Sangorski, with decorative borders and illuminated miniatures.

Inside front cover of “The Sensitive Plant” is embellished with multicolored leather onlyas, inlays, and gold tooling.

Csak mert szépek. De ha valaki bármelyiket ajándékba szánná nekünk…

(via millionsmillions)

2,674 notes

neil-gaiman:

odditiesoflife:

The Mystery of “Nancy Drew” and the Author that Never Was

The Hardy Boys, Nancy Drew, the Bobbsey Twins, and Tom Swift were all the product of one man, Edward Stratemeyer, a New Jersey author who wrote more than 1,300 books and eventually founded a syndicate of ghostwriters who pounded out juvenile mysteries based on his instructions. Thus book syndication was born. They were referred to as “book factories” and were extremely profitable.

Stratemeyer conceived the syndicate when his Rover Boys series proved so popular that he could not keep up with the demand for more books. He corralled a stable of hungry young writers, and in 1910 they were producing 10 new series annually. Each writer earned $50 to $250 for a manuscript he could produce in a month, working with characters and plot devised by Stratemeyer. He would review each completed manuscript for consistency and publish it under a pseudonym that he owned — Franklin W. Dixon, Carolyn Keene, Laura Lee Hope, Victor Appleton. Each book in a series mentioned the thrilling earlier volumes and foreshadowed the next book. The formula worked so well that when Stratemeyer died in 1930 his daughter continued the business; when she died in 1982 the syndicate was selling more than 2 million books a year.

This sounds cynical, but it worked because Stratemeyer had a sympathetic understanding of what young readers wanted. “The trouble is that very few adults get next to the heart of a boy when choosing something for him to read,” Stratemeyer wrote to a publisher in 1901. “A wide awake lad has no patience with that which is namby-pamby, or with that which he puts down as a ‘study book’ in disguise. He demands real flesh and blood heroes who do something.”

Writing books. I am obviously doing it wrong.

Az ember, akinek több mint 1300 könyve jelent meg

1,142 notes

moshita:

Body Parts, Live Breath Art is a series of sculptures in which the artist took pages and pages of recycled books and transformed them into spiraling, abstract impressions of body parts.

The layers of repetitive shapes were inspired by Sawyer’s feelings that art is a piece of what makes her whole and something that runs through her veins. Each sculpture represents a body part including a spine, a pelvis, and lungs. As an adult who has overcome many obstacles with words and reading, the artist chose to use pages from books as a representation of her past struggles. The combination of her academic weaknesses with her artistic strengths resulted in these simple structures that emit a powerful beauty. The gradients of color that run through each piece were first created manually with ink and special lighting, and then digitally manipulated to offer variations of each sculpture.

Bronia Sawyer

Könyv újrafelhasználás

(Source: moshita, via bookish)